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Form & Compass School Feng Shui

Master Yang's principles came to be regarded as the "Form School" of Feng Shui, which rationalises good or bad sites in terms of Dragon symbolism. According to this school, good Feng Shui locations require the presence of the Dragon, and where there is the true Dragon, there will also be found the White Tiger.

Feng Shui Masters who subscribe to the Form School begin their search for favourable locations by first searching for the Dragon. Emphasis was thus put on landforms, shapes of hills and mountains, waterways, their orientations and directions.

While Dragon symbolism was the principle mainstay of the Form School, there eventually emerged a second major system that approached the practice of Feng Shui from quite different perspectives. This second system laid stress on metaphysical speculations, using the symbols of the I Ching - or Book of Changes, and the Trigrams and the Hexagrams - three and six-lined symbols to calculate good and bad Feng Shui.

The Trigrams were placed around an eight-sided octagonal symbol called the Pa Kua, and according to where each of these eight Trigrams were placed, other corresponding attributes and symbols were further identified. These refer to colours, to different members of the family, to specific compass directions, to one of the five elements and to other attributes.

Each of these symbols and attributes were supposed to offer "clues" for designing homes, for allocating different rooms, for different purposes and for assigning different members of the family to different corners of the home in order to maximise auspicious Feng Shui for the entire family.

This second major system came to be collectively referred to as the Compass School of Feng Shui, and depending on which branch of this school is being practised, the calculations took on different equations and methods.

Certain branches of Compass School also emphasized the influence of the planets on the quality of locations. In contrast to the Form School, it assigned only minor importance to landscape configurations, relying heavily instead on complex calculations of actual dimensions, compass directions and sectors of main entrances and important rooms.

By the late 19th and early 20th centuries, however, the two schools had merged completely. Theories of the Form School including beliefs in Dragon symbolism gained wider acceptability and practice amongst followers of the Compass School. Today, Feng Shui practitioners in Hong Kong and Taiwan customarily practise a hazy combination of both schools.

Between the two schools, the Form School, with its heavy emphasis on the natural landscape, requires a greater amount of intuitive insight. It is therefore considered harder to practice even though the Green Dragon/White Tiger symbolisms are relatively easy to comprehend. The Compass School method is harder to learn and its formulae more difficult to grasp, but once mastered, is considered easier to practice due to its more precise methodologies.
 
     
Modern science has only recently discovered that the earth's atmosphere is crowded with powerful but invisible energy waves and lines that enable us to enjoy telephones and radios, fax machines and satellite communications.
Master Yang's principles came to be regarded as the "Form School" of Feng Shui, which rationalises good or bad sites in terms of Dragon symbolism. According to this school, good Feng Shui locations require the presence of the Dragon, and where there is the true Dragon, there will also be found the White Tiger.
   
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